Meet the Ladies

​As many of you know, I have a bit of a chicken collection…ok, addiction!  With over 80 layers on the farm, it is not difficult to fall in love with these sweet and friendly creatures. I thought I would introduce you to a few of our favorites…

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Meet “Big White”.  She is a light Brahma and truly a gentle giant, with feathered legs and feet.

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Meet Marshmallow!  She is a white Silkie and is the “puppy” of the chicken world! Silkies have blue skin and feathered feet.
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Meet Skunk and my sweet daughter, El!  Skunk is a mottled Cochin Bantam.  A bantam  is a miniature sized chicken.  Skunk is an amazing mother and hatched 12 chicks this Spring.
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Meet Sweetie and her Seabright and Old English pals!  They are also bantam chickens.  They lay tiny eggs that are great for hard boiling and adding to salads.
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Meet Lily!  Lily is a Blue Cochin.  Taking a close-up photo of her is very difficult.  She is extremely camera-shy!
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Meet Mavis!  Mavis is a Polish chicken and a favorite on the farm.  Polish chickens are known for their quirky personalities!   Her partner in crime is Flo…you will meet her in the short video clip below!

Enjoy a little “bird action” from Indigo Acres!  This is proof that cats and birds can co-exist!

 

The girls free range all day and then return to their coops for the night.    We have three different chicken houses for layers: The Bantam/ Silkie/Polish House, The Easter Egger House and The Geriatric Chicken Condo (see the link below on this special house!). As you can see in the video, the Bantams, Silkies and Polish stay close to their home.  The full size chickens are off on an adventure, hunting for bugs and worms daily!  Remember, the chicken might cross the road, but the bugs don’t cross the chicken!  (hee-hee)

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“Do What You Love…Love What You Do!”

Love Yourself…Embrace Yourself…Just Be You…

Roda

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Want to learn more about life as a chicken, on our farm? Check out these posts! 

https://growingself.blog/2017/03/28/hard-boiling-farm-fresh-eggs/

https://growingself.blog/2017/04/17/the-exquisite-eggshell/

https://growingself.blog/2017/03/08/the-geriatric-chicken-condo/

https://growingself.blog/2017/04/18/new-beginnings/

https://growingself.blog/2017/05/01/i-hear-chirping/

https://growingself.blog/2017/05/12/unexpected-mama/

 

34 thoughts on “Meet the Ladies

  1. Loads of chickens! Lol. I can’t decide whether I want chickens or not. My friend has 3 and loves that she has fresh eggs everyday. Ummmm. With a dog and 2 cats, I wonder who would end up being “boss”? The chickens i expect!

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  2. That is a lot of chickens. Our daughter and family started with 12 chickens they lost 2 so they are down to 10 and 3 of those are roosters lol. Question: When do you add more chickens so that you always have layers? I heard layers only lay for 2 years is that correct?

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    1. They lay well for the first 2 years. But, we have 4 year old girls still giving us a few eggs each week. One never knows. The chickens raised for higher egg production don’t tend to live as long. We like to stick to many of the heritage lines. We try to purchase 12 new birds every other year…this year was an off year, but we let a broody hatch eggs! I love chicks!

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      1. We feed the girls a base layer feed by Nutrena called Nature Wise. Keep in mind, they free range all day on our 13 acres, eating bugs and critters. We do not go through as much feed this time of year as we do in the winter. In the winter, we grow our own fodder for them. We also grow cold crops, such as lettuce, in the hoop houses, which allows the chickens and ducks to have greens all winter long. On average, we probably use 6-8 40lb bags of feed every month for the chickens.🐔

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      2. That is a lot less grain than I would have thought. Daughter and family are doing the free range thing as well on the 4 acres. She is going to be doing the hydroponic gardening in the hoop houses. Shes done some of this already but not in the green houses. I think lettuce is 1 month from seed to picking.

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      3. Free ranging helps a ton. Winter is a bit more expensive. Growing the fodder helps with cost. Selling eggs easily off sets my bird costs. We grow 3 different squashes and store them for as long as we can. The girls love them! They especially love watermelon!!

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